Alzheimer’s and the Family Caregiver

November is National Family Caregivers Month and National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

These observances help raise awareness about the challenges of caregiving for families, especially Alzheimer’s caregiving, as well as increase support for and educate caregivers and their communities. The current COVID-19 pandemic has also presented new realities and stresses.

Read More

Read More

An Overview of Veteran Benefits

As we age, we find ourselves requiring different types of help. Medical needs are typically covered by Medicare. But many of us come to need assistance that is nonmedical in nature (e.g., help bathing or dressing). We have to be prepared to pay for this kind of assistance out of pocket, on our own. If you served in the armed forces, Uncle Sam may have resources to help.

Read More

Read More

Advancing the Science: The Latest Discoveries in Alzheimer’s and Dementia Research

In the U.S., more than 5.8 million people age 65+ are living with Alzheimer’s disease and over 16 million provide unpaid care for people living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Aging Life Care Professionals regularly work with clients living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, and, as part of our membership with the Aging Life Care Association, we continue to educate ourselves to remain experts in aging well.

Read More

Read More

Choosing a home care provider

Frank knows they need help at home. His wife’s dementia is getting worse, and he has his own health problems. She can’t be left alone anymore.

Doing all the cooking and cleaning, and now helping with bathing … it’s just too much.

Frank needs to take breaks. But a Google search reveals a dizzying array of home care providers. How to choose?

Read More

Read More

Paying for care at home

How you pay for care at home depends on whether the service is by medically trained staff or by nonmedical caregivers. Also, what you can mix and match in terms of community programs and help from friends and family.

Read More

Read More

8 Tips for Solo Agers: Your Plan for a Healthy, Supported Future

It is estimated that nearly one-third of adults who are 55 and older are single. This group is sometimes referred to as “solo agers.” Top of mind for many solo agers is who will care for them when they start to need assistance. One survey of solo agers showed that 70% had not identified someone to care for them should they need it, and 35% indicated that they did not have anyone who could help them in a crisis. For individuals without family, proactive planning is essential. Read More

Read More